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FThis quarter we’re excited to highlight Greater Phoenix's nature scenes and diverse architecture in an exhibition themed “Arizona Landmarks & Architecture.”

Greater Phoenix through the eyes of local artists

New GPEC art exhibit presents Arizona’s unique traits

Every quarter we partner with artists and curate unique and stunning pieces of art to display and have available for purchase at our office. This quarter we’re excited to highlight the beauty and diversity of our incredible region in an exhibition themed “Arizona on Display.” From indigenous vegetation, picturesque landscapes, iconic landmarks, and native tribal traditions, we want to showcase it all.

So let’s get to know the artists and find out what they hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Jon Arvizu, Phoenix, AZ

Dusk

Mono silkscreen, 22″ x 28″

“I hope viewers take away the bold, graphic style of my work and an interest in the process, says Arvizu. “Screen printing is one of the oldest forms of printmaking and these large mono silkscreen serigraphs are multi-layered, small edition prints using painstakingly hand-cut paper stencils.”

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Gilat Ben-Dor, Scottsdale, AZ

Wild Santa Rita

Acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 48″ x 36″ together

“People often think of a desert as a dusty, desolate stretch of beiges,” says Ben-Dor. “With my Wild Santa Rita diptych, I wanted to share the colorful splendor and interesting variety of the desert flora here in the Greater Phoenix area. I also wanted to increase the appetite of both tourists and locals to explore and appreciate the surprising lushness of our environment.”

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Heather Coen, Gilbert, AZ

Canyon Light 

Pastel, 18″ x 24″

“One tool I use as an inspiration for my paintings is the contrast of the desert,” says Coen. “I hope viewers see that the light in our state is very different from most of the United States. We have very clear skies, which makes the light brighter and more vivid, especially coloring the shadows with warm blues and purples. Landscape colors are often exact opposites on the color wheel, bright orange cliffs against very turquoise skies.”

 

Brenda EdwardsFind out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

The Torch

Oil on gallery wrapped canvas, 24″ x 36″

“I would like them to take a piece of the habitat they want to be a part of with them when they settle and build a business in Phoenix,” says Edwards. “Much of my work examines the impact of the environment on people and vice versa. It’s been historically proven that achieving harmony in that exchange and appreciating the natural world and its inherent needs is essential to the success of any society and business.”

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Linda Enger, Phoenix, AZ

Emergent

Giclee print on canvas, 20″ x 30″

“I hope viewers will take a moment with this image, ponder, and ask themselves if they see any symbolism that speaks to them,” says Enger.

 

Jo Gilbert, Sedona, AZFind out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Sedona, Arizona

Acrylic on gallery wrapped canvas, 3′ x 4′

“My main hope is that people will see this painting and it will brighten their day,” says Gilbert. “Arizona is a beautiful State and it’s important to celebrate and appreciate that. I love how art can make us look again at things we can sometimes take for granted.

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Mackenzie Heinemann, Phoenix, AZ

Wish You Were Here

Watercolor on yupo paper, 20″ x 30″

“I hope people who look at this piece will feel comfort in the present moment,” says Heinemann. “We will all experience loss in our lives, and it’s important to recognize that we share the same emotions.

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Hal Maynard, Tucson, AZ

Saguaro National Park

Photography, 12″ x 8″

“The city of Phoenix and other areas in the north are represented often, so hopefully this reminds viewers of the beauty that’s a little further south,” says Maynard.

 

 

Devon Meyer

“I hope viewers gain a deeper respect for the desert and get a feeling of excitement about desert flowers that are here in Phoenix,” says Meyer. “After seeing my work, viewers might notice something simple but beautiful that they have not seen before, like light passing through a petal.”

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Pink & Yellow

Oil painting, 8″ x 8″

 

 

 

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community. White Blooms

Oil painting, 6″ x 8″

 

 

 

 

 

Ellen Nemetz

“I hope that people viewing these artworks will see how beautiful and diverse our desert is,” says Nemetz. “Art creates a sense of pride in where we live by bringing in tourism and encouraging engagement in community activities.”

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Havasu

Acrylic on linen, 36″ x 60″

 

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Lower Salt River 

Acrylic on linen, 36″ x 60″

 

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Lower Lake Mary

Acrylic on linen, 24″ x 20″

 

 

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community. Red Hot

Acrylic on linen, 24″ x 30″

 

 

 

 

 

Vanessa Ortiz, Phoenix, AZ

“What I hope viewers take away from viewing my artwork is a sense of peace,” says Ortiz. “I create very colorful art so that it can take away the negativity of the world around, lifting their spirit to a more vibrant world.”

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community. Sun Down

Acrylic on black canvas, 16″ x 20″

 

 

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Heart of the Superstition

Alcohol ink on yupo paper, 14″ x 20″

 

 

 

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Joanna Proffitt, Surprise, AZ

Dancing in the Light

Photograph, 17″ x 23″

“I hope viewers take away an appreciation for the many wonders of Arizona, big and small,” says Proffitt. “Our natural environment is stunningly beautiful and offers so many gifts to those living within it.  We all need to work together to take care of it.

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Nancy Romanovsky, Glendale, AZ

Tour of the Mogollon Rim

Oil on linen, 8″ x 26″

“I hope my piece will remind viewers of the diverse natural wonders Arizona has to offer,” says Romanovsky. “Instead of a single image divided into three panels, as is typical in triptychs, I use this format to show three different vantage points of an area.

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Bruce Stam, Phoenix, AZ

Barrel of Light

Oil on linen, 9″ x 12″

“Artists often see the world differently and I wanted people who view my painting to see the great beauty of the Sonoran Desert,” says Stam. “Our landscapes can be a bit prickly at times, but these rough edges splashed with the great light of the Sonoran Desert becomes magical when the sun rises and sets.”

 

 

Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.Ans Taylor, Prescott, AZ

Sonora Sundown

Oil on copper, 12″ x 12″

“Since I started my journey of painting Arizona, one effect I have noticed for me personally is the gift of new eyes,” says Taylor. “The process of painting outside is a complex one: the artist is forced to simplify and quickly transport impressions of the landscape onto a canvas while the light is moving rapidly and multiplies into a myriad of shades. I hope that the gift of new eyes will be transferred also to the viewer of the paintings and accompany them out on their next encounters with nature.”

 

 

Sean “Zanereti” Oday, Scottsdale, AZ Find out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Agave Crura

Lithograph 2018, 24″ x 36″

“My piece represents a connection with nature in a literal sense,” says Zanereti. “Using the desert flora of our state, I hope to identify the striking similarities and differences we share with the living things that inhabit and thrive in the same environment we do. I also hope to identify a connection to the landscape around us and take notice to its subtle delicacies. The desert can be known for its harsh place. However, when we look deeper we see how life is able to exist here.”

 

 

Bianka Alban, Phoenix, AZFind out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

As the Sun Settles

Acrylic on canvas, 16″ x 12″

 

 

 

Debbie Rowley, Phoenix, AZFind out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Desert Winter

11” x 14” framed 17 1/2” x 21 1/2”

 

 

 

Monica Ucelo, Glendale, AZFind out what our featured artists hope viewers will take away from seeing their art and the overall impact of art on the community.

Arizona Sunset

Acrylic piece on canvas, 16″ x 20″

 

 

 

 

 

All artwork is available for purchase with 100% of the sale price going directly to the artists. If you’re interested in purchasing them, contact us for more information.